Big Risks Ahead

Many think that operating a small business has little or no risk. The fact is, operating a small business has just about the same risks as any other business. Employees can still sue you, you can cause injuries to your customers, and your building can burn just like a big business.  General liability risk is very real for small businesses and it is important to have a business insurance program that addresses these issues.

To protect a small business from potential lawsuits, liability insurance is necessary. Policies vary greatly, and they cover different classifications of risks for varying costs.

Commercial General Liability Insurance covers claims from accidents, injuries, or negligence when the business is at fault.  Small businesses may face a wide array of damage charges. Personal injuries, property damage, libel, and slander are just a few examples.

Product Liability Insurance covers legal fees for litigation involving a faulty product.  It also covers any personal or property damage charges caused by the defective product.

Employment Liability Insurance provides protection for an employer against claims made by employees, former employees, or potential employees.  It can cover discrimination (age, sex, race, disability, etc.), wrongful termination of employment, sexual harassment, and other employment-related allegations.

Professional Liability Insurance pays for damages caused by services.  It is also called errors and omissions coverage. This is for companies that market a service instead of a product. For example, professionals in medical clinics must have medical malpractice coverage.

Cyber Liability Insurance covers the risk posed by conducting business over the Internet, over other networks, or using electronic storage technology.  It covers third party losses from hackers, theft, and loss of information including sensitive client or individual personal information.

There are other types of insurance designed for specialty businesses. For example, there are special policies for companies involved only in internet sales.  The nature of the business determines what type of coverage is necessary.

Risk And Insurance Issues Faced By Most Businesses

A 2018 Business Insurance Update

Risk management and insurance issues that your local business faces are not that much different from those faced by fortune 500 companies; fortune 500 companies’ risks are just larger and possibly more complex.  Making sure that you have the right kind of business insurance for protecting your operations is our number one goal.

Recently, PC360.com ran an article describing the top risks for large corporations.  We thought we would relate these risks to your local business, and suggest some insurance that your business should consider to cover these risks.

Business Interruption Insurance – This can include lost net income, continuing expenses, and even relocation expenses. This coverage is not always automatic, and needs to be added with specific limits.

Directors and Officers Liability – Directors and officer’s liability insurance helps protect your business, owners, executives, and managers if individuals, competitors, third parties or government regulators make claims.

Regulatory Compliance Issues – New regulations and contractual risks are increasing for all organizations. Issues include; contracted employee, healthcare, workers’ compensation laws, environmental issues, cyber reporting requirements, and more.

Employee Safety – Maintaining a safe working environment should always be a top priority for your business.

Cyber Liability – Did you know that the average business has a greater chance of having a cyber breach than it does of having a fire? It is true, and your business insurance policy most likely will not cover cyber liability losses. “This new world of connected devices promises insights on which companies can base strategic decisions. But the ability to obtain more information brings the responsibility to use that data appropriately, maintain customers’ privacy, and practice effective cybersecurity.”  com

 

How to Prepare Your Business for Holiday Risks

office-875697_640A Business Insurance Update

The next few months are important for every business. The holidays are not just for retailers, as many businesses rely on a healthy last quarter to help them finish the year in the black.  Your business insurance plays an important role in this, as it protects you from un-planned losses.

Here are a few tips to help your business plan for the holiday, and year’s end.

During the holiday shopping season, many businesses hire seasonal workers to help with the increased demand. Make sure all part-time and seasonal employees are properly trained, and understand the requirements of the job.

Employee theft is a big problem during the holidays as well. However, more than just stock or equipment theft, employees have access to other major assets, like cash, too.  Make sure you have proper accounting processes in place.

If your business has increased revenue during the last quarter, verify that your business income insurance will address the seasonal increase.

When it comes to decorations around the office, you will want to ensure that none of them creates opportunities for accidents. This means being aware of extra lighting and candles that might be part of the holiday office décor, and making sure no decorations act as a trip and fall hazard.

Workers’ Compensation Risks For Growing Companies

In today’s ever changing business world, every business needs quality employees to help the business meet client demand, grow revenue, and manage risk. Today’s growing businesses need to understand the importance of an effective business insurance program. Workers’ Compensation insurance is a central part of that program.

There are at least five kinds of employees that define today’s workers.

Temporary worker–Businesses are using temporary workers at an increased rate. Employers must comply with updated labor and OSHA regulations. Temporary workers face a much higher injury rate than do regular employees.

Contractors–Some businesses use contractors to try to get around labor laws, workers’ compensation, and unemployment statutes. Both the State and Federal Governments are cracking down on these practices, and have established new definitions and guidelines as to how employees are defined.

Fist job employees–Lack of experience and training can lead to increased injury rates among new employees.

Seasonal employees–Long work hours and little to no training increases risk of injury and loss to employers.

Shift workers–If your business operates three shifts you may not have the same attention to safety during the 2nd or 3rd shift. Make sure all staff receives the same training.